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Thursday, September 18, 2014

WARNING: Scam attempt: Looks like Pandora & Silk Road 2.0 smell like Sheep


 WARNING: PANDORA IS A SCAMMER
Smells like a Sheep.......


In the last days i get tons of messageges from vendors and buyers from Pandora & Silk Road 2.0 and they all tell me the same things. That you cant login any more (as a vendor at Pandora Market).You can login as a buyer and you can send money to your account, but you are not able to withdraw it any more, so all money you have sent to Pandora is lost.Also the forum and the admins are not available any more.So you didnt get any help or answers.
It looks that they try to find  as much as more idiots they can who send their money to Pandora Market.
If you do that your money is definitely lost.No vendor will ship any item if he didnt get any access to his own account and to his money.At the moment no buyer or vendor can withdraw his bitcoins.
It looks like that the admins of Pandora Market play the same game like the owners of  Sheep Market who stole 40 Million Dollars.

The same things i also heard about Silk Road 2.0.
There is no captcha function, so all doors are open for spam bots, and many people (most of them buyers) told me that they are not able to withdraw their money.
And nothing from the orders they placed arrived in the last days.
If any seller cant get access to his vendor account, and also cant withdraw his money of course he didnt send anything.
For the moment thats all i can say.I will update when i get new informations.
But fot the moment dont send an money to Pandora or Silk Road 2.0.Its the same you burn it or throw it out of the window.

Hydra Market is the only market who works perfect,safe,always available, and i get only good response.Its the only market you can trust at the moment and who really works and is always fast & available (thats just my opinion).But since now i never heard from other users some bad news about Hydra Market.
Notes New marketplace - Offering full multisig transactions,  registration only with referral link, included in marketplace url to enable registration.
Since Silk Road 2.0 is not available because of a DDoS attack, this is the next hot place to be.This market is a absolut hightlight and the most growing market since the last weeks.
You can pay with Litecoin and of course with the good old  Bitcoin.
Have a good shopping time ! See you @ Hydra


DO NOT SENT ANY BITCOINS TO PANDORA MARKET
OR TO SILK ROAD 2.0  - ONCE YOUR MONEY IS THERE
YOU ARE NOT ABLE TO WITHDRAW IT ANYMORE.
YOUR MONEY IS LOST FROM THE MOMENT YOU SENT IT TO PANDORA OR SIK ROAD 2.0

I dont know why this happend again and again, but i keep you in touch until i know more.
 The one and only safe market at the moment i can commend is Hydra Market.
 Offering full multisig transactions (most secure method at the moment).

HYDRA Marketplace url:  http://hydrampvvnunildl.onion/register/p9pvmznbsl4n


Notes New marketplace - Offering full multisig transactions,  registration only with referral link, included in marketplace url to enable registration.
Since Silk Road 2.0 is not available because of a DDoS attack, this is the next hot place to be.This market is a absolut hightlight and the most growing market since the last weeks.
You can pay with Litecoin and of course with the good old  Bitcoin.
Have a good shopping time ! See you @ Hydra

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Ulbricht's Defense Doubts FBI's Explanation Of How It Found Silk Road's Servers



S Back in August 2013, Reuters revealed that the DEA was receiving information from the NSA about suspects who had no connection to terrorism. Worse still, the NSA then gave tips to the DEA on how to hide that fact from the entire justice system, including judges and defense attorneys.
How a law enforcement agency obtains its evidence is key to trials in America. The technique is called “parallel construction” but a more accurate name would be “evidence fabrication” and the report was concerning to anyone who cares if our justice system has any shred of justice in it.
If law enforcement lies about how it obtained evidence, then it is lying about the credibility of its evidence. Lying about the credibility of evidence is no better than lying about evidence itself. If a judge cannot properly determine how much weight something should hold, or if it should be admissible at all, then how can he or she be expected to come to a fair and just verdict?
By playing loose and fast with the rules, law enforcement is destroying the very systems they claim to protect. It is those kinds of shenanigans that Ross Ulbricht's defense says the government used in the investigation that eventually led to Ulbricht's arrest. Ross Ulbricht is accused of running the Silk Road Marketplace and has been charged with several crimes, including money laundering, narcotics trafficking and a “Kingpin” charge that is normally reserved for the heads of organized crime elements. Ross has plead Not Guilty to all charges.
The key point of contention between the defense and the prosecution at the present moment centers on how the FBI tracked down the Silk Road's servers. The Defense argues that it was done without a warrant, possibly in conjunction with the NSA. The FBI contends that it was the Silk Road's own security lapses, in this case a leaky CAPTCHA service that leaked the information.
We don't know how the FBI obtained the Silk Road's IP address, because the one thing we do know is that it wasn't done the way they said they did it.
For those who haven't been following along: The Silk Road was an online anonymous marketplace that allowed for the selling of anything, legal or illegal, for Bitcoin. Since eBay and Amazon have the majority of the legal market on lock-down, most of the goods and services on the Silk Road happened to fall on the illegal side. Since you can't exactly make a site called wesellillegalthings.com and expect it to not be shut down, it ran inside of the Tor network.
The Tor network is a bit like an internet within an internet. Users can use it to browse sites anonymously by going in and out of its nodes, but they can also visit sites that exist in between those nodes, commonly referred to as “hidden services.” This allows users to run a website or service while making is much more difficult for authority types (or anyone else) to figure out who is running the site.
There are some vulnerabilities in the Tor network, and the Government pointed to them in their affidavit. However, the examples they pointed to all applied to Tor users, not the Tor hidden services like the Silk Road. Those are generally seen as secure.
The FBI investigator claims that he figured out the IP address of the Silk Road's Icelandic servers by monitoring information packets sent out from a CAPTCHA service that existed outside of the Tor Network.
Reputable security expert Nik Cubrilovic has a complete break down on exactly why the government's story is impossible. The most damning evidence is that the CAPTCHA used on the Silk Road was not a third party CAPTCHA service but the same CAPTCHA service used by Tor itself.
It is possible, perhaps even likely, that the FBI managed to obtain the Silk Road's server location in another fashion, without the NSA's help. There were known vulnerabilities in the Silk Road's security. The problem is those methods would have required a bit more sleuthing and may have reached a level that makes obtaining a warrant necessary, even in this post-9/11 world where Judges generally give law enforcement whatever they want.
The prosecution has focused on the defense's concerns about NSA parallel construction, painting it as the paranoid delusions of someone who is desperate. But the fact of the matter is, the FBI's story simply does not add up. Once it becomes apparent that the FBI is lying about how it obtained evidence, regardless if the NSA helped or not, they have perverted the trial's results and by proxy, the entire Justice System. That is something that should concern not only the Bitcoin community, but every individual who believes in justice.
Ross Ulbricht's trial is set for November 3rd. You can donate to his legal defense here. Bitcoin evangelist Roger Ver has pledged to back donations made by the community whenever donations reach over US $20,000 in a month.
Did you enjoy this article? You may also be interested in reading these ones:

Original thread here:   http://cointelegraph.com/news/112526/ulbrichts-defense-doubts-fbis-explanation-of-how-it-found-silk-roads-servers

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Hydra Marketplace - The next hot marketplace to be with the latest safety features

Notes New marketplace - Offering full multisig transactions,  registration only with referral link, included in marketplace url to enable registration.
Since Silk Road 2.0 is not available because of a DDoS attack, this is the next hot place to be.This market is a absolut hightlight and the most growing market since the last weeks.
You can pay with Litecoin and of course with the good old  Bitcoin.
Have a good shopping time ! See you @ Hydra

  http://hydrampvvnunildl.onion/register/p9pvmznbsl4n

How Online Black Markets Have Evolved Since Silk Road’s Downfall



Yarek Waszul
When the FBI tore down the billion-dollar drugs-and-contraband website Silk Road last October, its death made room for a new generation of black-market bazaars—many with better defenses against the Feds. Nearly a year later, more drugs are sold online than when the Silk Road ruled the dark web, according to a study by the Digital Citizens Alliance last April. Here’s how the world of anonymous ecommerce has mutated and evolved over the last year.
Silk Road 2.0
A month after the FBI arrested 29-year-old Ross Ulbricht, the alleged Silk Road creator known as Dread Pirate Roberts, someone else using the same pseudonym launched Silk Road 2.0. This defiant clone of the original claimed that its source code was backed up to 500 locations in 17 countries, so if authorities shut it down, administrators can rebuild in 15 minutes flat. “If Silk Road was taken down we could have it up and running again within 15 minutes,” wrote the new DPR. “Hydra effect on a massive scale.”
Evolution
In February, Silk Road 2.0 said it had been hacked, losing $2.7 million in users’ bitcoins. Tired of seeing their coins stolen or seized by the cops, savvy users migrated to sites like Evolution, Cloud Nine, and the Marketplace, which allow multisignature transactions—bitcoins are held in escrow at an address agreed on by buyer, seller, and the site. To move them, two out of three parties must sign off on a deal.
OpenBazaar
A Virginia coder named Brian Hoffman created this open source project to be a fully peer-to-peer uncensorable marketplace: Product listings are hosted on the computers of anonymous users, and freelance arbiters settle disputes for a fee. Hoffman says he’s not inviting in drug dealers, but that he can’t stop them from crashing the party. And with potentially thousands of different computers hosting the network and no central target for the Feds, it could be nearly impossible to shut them down.

Original thread here: http://www.wired.com/2014/09/internet-black-market/   

Pandora Market: Is It Gone?


UpdateMarket is back up:  This was the Statement from the Admin:
Sorry guys, my bad, pandora will be back up soon, just serios technical issues combined with holiday time. I am Sorry for that shit !
The Story before was:
The same ritual every 2 months. So we can’t say that we did not see this one coming… Pandora market the fourth largest market (had around 8000 listings at this time) and one of the oldest post-silk road1 markets which already encountered a fair share of problems, consist of a series of issues during the previous months including the famous “hack” that raised the fees to 25%. Just to name a few:
But the market seems to be down for the past week and we did our best to say nothing until now, but since we receive many emails asking about what happened to Pandora – and we have no idea obviously, we can only assume its something along these lines:
gone[1]
Alice, the market admin is no where to be found, the forums are still though. We could only hope that after the so called hack few months ago there were not so many users on the market so not much money is lost, but since this market was around for a while, and was the fourth largest market according to most of the statistics done during this time, we can safely assume that a large sum of money IS in fact lost – assuming it won’t be back of course.
Even if this market will come back at some point it is advised to proceed with extreme caution in case you decide to keep using this market from some reason (We had a couple of cases where Alice was gone for a while and came back later to fix the issue)

We will try and get some more details and update, but as we experienced from previous marketplace scams that were just “gone” without much notice – like with SheepTormarket and Torescrow, we wont be holding our breathe waiting for followup or any further details.
This post will be updated with a notice in case the market will be back online in the next week or so, if not,  the market will be moved to the dead markets section in the Hidden marketplace list, and will be removed from the sidebar uptime monitor.

How to proceed from here?

Simple:
1. Start here – Multisig Guides
2. Than Continue to here to the multisig category- Updated List of Hidden Marketplaces
Sorry for those who have their money stuck / lost on Pandora, and hopefully this will be sorted and won’t happen again (but we can safely assume it probably will).

Share and Enjoy

 

 

Original thread here: http://www.deepdotweb.com/2014/07/21/pandora-market-is-it-gone/ 

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Silk Road Suspect Faces Fresh Round of Narcotics Trafficking Charges


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Original thread here:   http://www.sometechnews.com/news/silk-road-suspect-faces-fresh-round-of-narcotics-trafficking-charges

Silk Road’s Alleged Mastermind Faces More U.S. Charges



The man accused of running the $1.2 billion online “black-market bazaar” known as Silk Road faces three new charges including trafficking in phony identification.
Ross William Ulbricht, accused of operating the marketplace where customers used bitcoins for anonymity, was also charged with Internet drug trafficking in a revised indictment yesterday in Manhattan federal court. Silk Road was shut down by federal authorities last year.
“Ulbricht reaped commissions worth tens of millions of dollars generated from the illicit sales conducted through the site,” prosecutors said in the indictment. Ulbricht also attempted to pay for the murder of “several individuals he believed posed a threat to that enterprise,” the U.S. said.
Ulbricht, an Eagle Scout who earned an advanced degree in physics from Penn State University before abandoning academia to pursue a career in finance, was first charged in 2013 with running an illicit online market and is scheduled for trial Nov. 3. Other charges include conspiracy to commit computer hacking and money laundering.
The new charges “demonstrate the government’s penchant for converting a single alleged course of conduct into a set of multiple similar, interchangeable charges in an effort to improve its chances of having a jury, overwhelmed by the sheer number of charges, agree with the government on at least one,” Ulbricht’s lawyer, Joshua Dratel, said in an e-mail.
Ulbricht pleaded not guilty in February and has denied the allegations.

Dread Pirate

Anonymous Silk Road customers, including thousands of drug dealers, used bitcoin digital currency to buy heroin, LSD, phony passports and computer-hacking services, the U.S. said. The site was shut down by federal authorities in October and its alleged mastermind arrested.
Ulbricht, who the U.S. said ran Silk Road starting in January 2011, was known as “Dread Pirate Roberts” or “DPR,” after a character in the 1987 film “The Princess Bride.” Prosecutors said he operated “the most sophisticated and extensive criminal marketplace on the Internet.”
Ulbricht was also indicted in federal court in Maryland for allegedly trying to arrange the murder of an employee. He also denied those allegations.
Three alleged former employees, Andrew Michael Jones, Gary Davis and Peter Phillip Nash, were charged in a federal indictment unsealed in New York in December.
Federal agents seized about 174,000 bitcoins, valued at the time at more than $33.6 million, in connection with the Silk Road case. Ulbricht was arrested about the same time in San Francisco. Bitcoins currently trade at about $525 per coin, according to Bloomberg data.

Illegal Transactions

“The site has sought to make conducting illegal transactions on the Internet as easy and frictionless as shopping online at mainstream e-commerce websites,” the government said in court filings after his arrest.
Charlie Shrem, the former Bitcoin Foundation Inc. vice chairman, in April pleaded not guilty to charges that he tried to launder more than $1 million in the virtual currency in a case tied to Silk Road.
Last month, venture capitalist Tim Draper was the single winning bidder for a cache of 29,656 bitcoins at a U.S. government auction of the currency seized during the Silk Road investigation.
The criminal case is U.S. v. Ulbricht, 14-cr-068; the civil forfeiture case is U.S. v. Ulbricht, 13-cv-06919, U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York (Manhattan).
To contact the reporters on this story: Erik Larson in New York at elarson4@bloomberg.net; Bob Van Voris in federal court in Manhattan at rvanvoris@bloomberg.net
To contact the editors responsible for this story: Michael Hytha at mhytha@bloomberg.net; Andrew Dunn at adunn8@bloomberg.net Joe Schneider

Original thread here:   http://www.businessweek.com/news/2014-08-22/silk-road-s-ex-eagle-scout-mastermind-faces-new-u-dot-s-dot-charges

Bitcoin Pioneer Charlie Shrem Pleads Guilty to Silk Road Charges

Bitcoin Pioneer Charlie Shrem Pleads Guilty to Silk Road Charges



Bitcoin Exchange CEO Charlie Shrem Pleads Guilty
Charlie Shrem, operator of bitcoin exchange BitInstant.com, has pleaded guilty in the US to selling bitcoins to users of online black market Silk Road, which was closed by authorities for illegal and nefarious dealings.
Shrem admitted the charges at a New York federal court hearing, while another bitcoin trader Robert Faiella, who purchased large quantities of bitcoins from BitInstant for Silk Road users, also pleaded guilty.
The guilty plea from the traders was part of their deal with US prosecutors in order to settle the allegations.
The authorities claimed Shrem was aware of the use of bitcoins for buying illegal goods, and therefore he violated the Bank Secrecy Act, which requires financial institutions in the US to alert authorities to any suspicious activity.
The traders still face other punishments, and they will be sentenced on 20 January.
"Working together, Shrem and Faiella exchanged nearly $1 million in cash for bitcoins for the benefit of Silk Road users, so that the users could, in turn, make illegal purchases on Silk Road," the Justice Department said in a statement.
Shrem was arrested at JFK airport on 26 January, and he and Faiella were charged with selling more than $1m (£603,000, €765,000) worth of bitcoins to users of Silk Road, the website formerly operating as an anonymous drugs and ammunitions marketplace. Bitcoin was the only form of payment on the website.
Both Shrem and Faiella were charged with conspiring to commit money laundering and operating an unlicensed money transmitting business, according to a press release from the Manhattan US Attorney's office.
Appearing before the US District Court in Manhattan, Shrem was bailed after paying a $1m bond.
Shrem is one of the pioneers of bitcoin. He was vice-president of the BitCoin Foundation, a trade group that promotes bitcoin as an alternative currency.
The decentralised virtual currency is traded from person to person, avoiding middle men and significantly reducing commissions and fees.
While it is legal in many countries, the use of bitcoin for illegal purposes such as money laundering and drug trafficking has caused regulators to be extremely cautious about the currency.

 Original thread here: http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/bitcoin-pioneer-charlie-shrem-pleads-guilty-selling-virtual-currency-silk-road-users-1464083

Bitcoin operators plead guilty in Silk Road case

NEW YORK (AP) — The top executive of a New York City-based Bitcoin company and a Florida Bitcoin exchanger pleaded guilty Thursday to federal charges, admitting that they enabled the digital currency to be funneled to the black market website Silk Road.
Charlie Shrem, 24, of Manhattan, pleaded guilty in federal court there to aiding and abetting the operation of an unlicensed money transmitting business, while Robert Faiella, 54, of Cape Coral, Florida, pleaded guilty to operating an unlicensed money transfer business.
Sentencing was set for Jan. 20, when each faces as much as five years in prison.
The case grew from the government's shutdown of Silk Road. Shrem was chief executive officer of BitInstant; Faiella operated an unlicensed money transferring business.
They were accused of letting more than $1 million in Bitcoins reach the website. Both admitted during their pleas that they knew narcotics were bought and sold on the website.
U.S. District Judge Jed S. Rakoff asked Faiella whether he knew from December 2011 through last October that his Bitcoins would be used to buy and sell drugs and that it was illegal.
"Absolutely," Faiella answered.
Shrem said he knew that much of the business conducted on Silk Road involved the purchase and sale of narcotics.
"I knew what I did here was wrong," he told Rakoff.
Authorities have said Silk Road's San Francisco operator generated more than $1 billion in illicit business since 2011 on the website. It used Bitcoin, a tough-to-track digital currency, before being shut down.
Prosecutors said Faiella ran an underground Bitcoin exchange on the Silk Road website, operating under the username "BTCKing." They said he sold Bitcoins.
The government said Faiella filled his orders through Shrem's company from August 2011 until July 2013, when the company stopped operating.
Prosecutors said Shrem, who was vice chairman of a foundation dedicated to promoting the Bitcoin currency, failed to file a single suspicious activity report with the U.S. Treasury Department regarding Faiella.
"Robert Faiella and Charlie Shrem opted to travel down a crooked path — running an illegal money transmitting business that catered to criminals bent on trafficking narcotics on the dark web drug site, Silk Road," U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara said in a statement. "The approximately $1 million in Bitcoins Faiella and Shrem sold to these outlaws cost them a lot more than they bargained for and bought them today's convictions."
Marc Agnifilo, Shrem's attorney, said outside court that his client's crime was an aberration.
He said Shrem was dedicated to making Bitcoin a more useful form of currency.
Agnifilo said he would ask Rakoff at sentencing for leniency.
"If God smiles on him, hopefully he'll be back in the Bitcoin world," he said.
A lawyer for Faiella had no comment.



Original thread here: https://uk.news.yahoo.com/plea-scheduled-ny-bitcoin-operator-061723688.html#IT4anFa

Accused Silk Road ‘Pirate’ Denies New U.S. Charges



The man accused of running the $1.2 billion online “black-market bazaar” known as Silk Road pleaded not guilty to three new charges, including Internet drug trafficking.
Ross William Ulbricht, charged with running the illegal marketplace where customers used bitcoins to buy drugs and fake IDs anonymously, appeared in Manhattan federal court today to answer the new allegations contained in a revised indictment.
Ulbricht, who was known online as “Dread Pirate Roberts” after a character in the 1987 film “The Princess Bride,” faces a Nov. 10 trial. He’s been jailed since being charged last year with running Silk Road, which prosecutors called “the most sophisticated and extensive criminal marketplace on the Internet.”
Anonymous Silk Road customers, including thousands of drug dealers, used bitcoin digital currency to buy heroin, LSD, phony passports and computer-hacking services, the U.S. said. The site was shut down by federal authorities in October.
The case is U.S. v. Ulbricht, 14-cr-00068, U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York (Manhattan).
To contact the reporter on this story: Bob Van Voris in federal court in Manhattan at rvanvoris@bloomberg.net
To contact the editors responsible for this story: Michael Hytha at mhytha@bloomberg.net David Glovin, Andrew Dunn

Silk Road allegedly taken down by leaky Captcha


Summary: The United States Federal Bureau of Investigation used a leaky Captcha prompt to take down the servers of the Silk Road anonymous marketplace, according to claims in court documents filed late last week.
Former FBI agent Christopher Tarbell has claimed that the agency tracked down the servers of anonymous online marketplace Silk Road by employing an IP leak caused by a Captcha prompt on the site's login page.
The anonymous online marketplace, popular as a black market trading bazaar, was taken down in October last year, with its owner and operator the Dread Pirate Roberts, aka Ross William Ulbricht, arrested at San Francisco airport.
Silk Road employed the anonymous Tor internet privacy network in order to keep its true IP address and web server location secret, but, according to Tarbell's declaration (PDF) for the United States of America v. Ross Ulbricht case being heard at the Southern District New York District Court, the FBI tracked down the Silk Road server by allegedly using the leaky Captcha prompt.
"During the course of the FBI's investigation of the Silk Road website, the SR Server was located by myself and another member of the CY-2 squad of the FBI New York Field Office as a result of such a leak," said Tarbell, who is a former computer forensic examiner with the FBI's global forensic team, and also served as a lead case agent in the Silk Road investigation while part of the FBI's CY-2 cybercrime squad.
"The IP address leak we discovered came from the Silk Road user login interface," said Tarbell in his declaration. "Upon examining the individual packets of data being sent back from the website, we noticed that the headers of some of the packets reflected a certain IP address not associated with any known Tor node as the source of the packets. This IP address (the 'Subject IP Address') was the only non-Tor source IP address reflected in the traffic we examined.
"The Subject IP Address caught our attention because, if a hidden service is properly configured to work on Tor, the source IP address of traffic sent from the hidden service should appear as the IP address of a Tor node, as opposed to the true IP address of the hidden service, which Tor is designed to conceal.
"When I typed the Subject IP Address into an ordinary (non-Tor) web browser, a part of the Silk Road login screen (the Captcha prompt) appeared. Based on my training and experience, this indicated that the Subject IP Address was the IP address of the SR Server, and that it was 'leaking' from the SR Server because the computer code underlying the login interface was not properly configured at the time to work on Tor," he said.
Former Washington Post writer Brian Krebs, who posted segments of Tarbell's declaration on his Krebs on Security site over the weekend, said that although Ulbricht's alleged accidental mixing of open internet content with the fabric of the Silk Road site could be considered a "noob mistake", staying anonymous online could be a tricky task, even for "hardened cybercroocks".
In October last year, after the Silk Road site had been shut down, prosecutors said they seized approximately $3.6 million worth of bitcoins in the largest ever seizure of the digital currency.
"The Silk Road website has served as a sprawling black market bazaar where illegal drugs and other illicit goods and services have been regularly bought and sold by the site's users," said Tarbell in a criminal complaint filed at the time.

Original story here:   http://www.zdnet.com/silk-road-allegedly-taken-down-by-leaky-captcha-7000033406/

Fresh Set Of Charges Laid Against Ross Ulbricht


Ross UlbrichtA verdict has been determined on Ross Ulbricht’s case. He will be facing life in prison as a result of his alleged operations on the internet drug lair called Silk Road, which is where both sellers and buyers were able to send soft and hard drugs across the globe. His initial indictment happened back in February of this year with four criminal charges including, criminal and money hacking conspiracy, drug trafficking, each of which he profusely continues to deny. On Friday the 22nd of August, he faced three new charges as the Silkroad Kingpin, including identity fraud and narcotics trafficking.
The US Government laid in a 17-page amended document introducing one count each for every narcotics distribution and trafficking through the virtual facet and his fraudulent act of providing false identification documents. His attorney Joshua Dratel, however, told CoinDesk how the new charges did not in any way modify the nature of evidence. According to the new seconding indictment, the drug charges happen to be in connection with at least a kilogram of heroin, 10 grams of LSD, 500 grams of meth and 5 kilograms of cocaine sold through Silk Road.
Bitcoin-APSince his October 2013 arrest, the FBI has seized over $33.6 million worth of Bitcoins from Ulbricht. The FBI claimed this amount of Bitcoins to have been proceeds stemming from the Silk Road operation. Early this month, Ulbricht argued in a memo that he was originally plotting on a portal called Underground Brokers, where people could buy and sell almost about anything anonymously. He claimed that he did not purposely create Silk Road for drug trafficking.
The indicted also called out the intrusion of the US authorities in trampling every bit of his digital privacy rights. Furthermore, the initial report on his drug trafficking operations triggered an ongoing investigation to every depth of his ESI (electronically stored information). It gave the authorities enough discretion to follow through the investigation.

Aug 22

Alleged Silkroad Vendors Were Arrested

>> Click here to find the Silk Road URL and know how to get to the Silk Road 2.0 <<
the_silk_road_001Started in 2011, the online marketplace Silkroad soon became the go-to place for all manner of illegal products. The users of Silkroad enjoyed the anonymity that they had even as they browsed. The Tor hidden services made it quite difficult for the Feds to pin down people in criminal charges. The original Silkroad was shut down temporarily before being opened up for business again as Silkroad 2.0.
Studies show that at least $30 million worth of business was being transacted on Silkroad by 2013. The business transactions are taking place courtesy of over 3800 vendors who are active site users. While the Feds have tried to hold these vendors, they are not having much luck on that front.
The Feds currently have the alleged mastermind of Silkroad Ross Ulbricht. Ross is expected to answer to charges of money laundering, conspiracy to traffic narcotics and computer hacking. He is also expected to answer to charges of conspiracy to planning a murder. For now, no one knows whether the prosecution will manage to get a conviction.
Silkroad_JacobThe FBI had previously arrested two previous Silkroad vendors Jacob Theodore George IV and Steven Lloyd Sadler. Jacob pleaded guilty to charges of selling bath salts and heroin while Sadler was arrested on heroin and cocaine charges. These two did cooperate with the government in the case against Ross. While their testimony may end up crucifying Ross, the burden of making that conviction rests mostly on the shoulders of the prosecution.
The fact of the matter is that three or four convictions compared to the over 3800 vendors on Silkroad is really a very small percentage. The volume of trade being done by these vendors is large. The FBI is not doing very well when it comes to arrests. The prosecution team on the other hand, is faring just as badly. As long as the Tor hidden services remain, the situation is not expected to improve. In fact, the success of the government in holding vendors accountable may go down because of Bitcoin and other digital currencies.
>> Click here to find the Silk Road URL and know how to get to the Silk Road 2.0 <<
Aug 09

Ross Ulbricht’s Family Create Legal Defence Fund


ross-ulbrichtFamily and friends of the alleged Silk Road developer Ross Ulbricht have set a fundraising campaign in motion to collect money for his legal defense. Ulbricht was arrested late 2013. The US government accused him of being an online entity known as Dread Pirate Roberts who is alleged to be behind the former online drug mega store Silk Road. He was charged in a New York court of a number of conspiracies including money laundering and illegal drug trafficking. Mr. Ulbricht also faces charges of conspiracy to allegedly commit murder in Maryland. Authorities there claim he colluded with an undercover operative to have Silkroad’s former executive murdered.
ross_in_prisonMr. Ulbricht’s trial is set to begin late this year in November and his family had hoped the site will help them raise about $250,000 to cater for his legal defense. Earlier on when Ross was first arrested, his friends had pledged to raise some $1,000,000 to secure his pre-trial release. The site, FreeRoss.com has so far closed in on the target with over $180,000 of the target amount raised. One of Ross’s friends, a rich and influential bit coin entrepreneur Roger Ver offered a $10 match up for every tweet done in creating awareness about the alleged Silkroad owner’s legal situation. His campaign elicited more than 16,000 tweets translating to over $160,000.
Through this campaign, the alleged Silk Road owner’s family is hoping to also inform the whole public about the legal implications of this case alongside raising money. They believe if Mr. Ulbricht is successfully convicted then the entire public can as well forget about Internet freedom going into the future. They also think that user privacy and regulations guarding crypto currency like bit coins are at stake should the government have its way. People willing help get the word out, learn the latest developments about the campaign or follow Mr. Ulbricht’s litigation  can do so by visiting FreeRoss.org. Those seeking to contribute can visit the link http://freeross.org/donate-now-2/