Listen Music during reading my blog

Saturday, November 30, 2013

IMPORTANT !! SCAM ATTEMPT - SHEEP MARKET TURNS INTO SCAMMER



It looks like there is the biggest scam attempt in history.
As many of you know its not possible since 10 days to withdraw any Bitcoins from Sheep Market.
No matter if you are a buyer or a seller.
It looks like that the owners of Sheep Market try to collect & safe as much as bitcoins they can, to close their doors the next days/hours and to steel all money.1 BTC = 830 Euros
100% of all money from the last 10 days from all sellers and buyers.
Since 10 days the owners are talking to implant an "Tumber system", thats the reason why the withdrawal is disabeled. Bullshit !!!
They only conjure excuses the last days.
Since 1 BTC is more than 830 Euro worth it looks they want to make a gig faud.
Why not ? Silk Road 1.0 was busted, and so they think they are maybe the next, and so they became the idea to steel as much money as they can before they close the doors for ever.
Clever idea.Since 10 days many people try to send bitcoins to any bitcoin exchange, but it doesnt work.You just get stupid excuses.
Since today also the forum is closed, so nobody can get any informations or warn others.
If you see all this facts, this is the only possible explanation for.
Maybe its just a rumor, but for me it sounds like the biggest scam attempt ever.
We know that there were some vendors who turned into scammers, but there never was a whole
Market who turned upon the dark site and turned into a scammer.


DO NOT SEND ANY BITCOINS TO SHEEP MARKET ANY MORE !

PLEASE SHARE & TELL THIS STORY TO ALL YOUR FRIENDS UNTIL THIS STORY IS CLARIFIED OR ANY ADMIN FROM SHEEP MARKET REFERS POSITION

BUT SINCE NOW IT LOOKS REALLY BAD !!

Friday, November 22, 2013

Doctor charged with selling drugs to local DEA agents via Silk Road

 

November 21, 2013|By Amy Pavuk, Orlando Sentinel

Federal drug agents in Orlando spent the summer buying painkillers, sedatives and other drugs from the underground — and now defunct — website Silk Road.
It was on the virtual drug marketplace, authorities said, that a Delaware physician sold hundreds of prescription drugs illegally and shipped them to Central Florida, throughout the U.S. and to people in more than 15 other countries.
On Thursday, agents arrested the doctor, 32-year-old Olivia Bolles, near her home, and prosecutors in Orlando unsealed a 54-page criminal complaint detailing the allegations against her.
Bolles' case is the first of its kind in Central Florida involving Silk Road, a website for global drug dealers and users who could sell and buy anything from cocaine to methamphetamine anonymously.
"Dr. Bolles was a respectable doctor by day and a drug trafficker by night when she went incognito on the underground website Silk Road to illegally sell highly abused pharmaceutical medications," said Special Agent in Charge Mark R. Trouville of the DEA's Miami division.
The arrest comes one month after federal agents shut down Silk Road and charged its founder, a 29-year-old former physics student from San Francisco, with building a drug empire with an estimated $1.2 billion in sales.
Orlando-based agents with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration said Bolles, who was a pharmacy technician before earning her medical degree from the University of Missouri-Columbia, operated on Silk Road under the name "MDPro," according to the criminal complaint. Bolles is not licensed to dispense controlled substances such as painkillers.
Federal documents show agents found more than 600 drug sales between MDPro and Silk Road users.
"Dr. Bolles' greed became a concern for public safety, and now she will face the consequences of her actions," Trouville said.
According to the criminal complaint, DEA agents bought oxycodone, Xanax, Adderall, hash oil and other drugs from "MDPro" from June to August.
When one of those orders arrived at an undercover address in Central Florida in June, an invoice for a "Sample Order" of "Sour Patch watermelon candy" was inside.
There was an envelope in the box that contained a sealed box of Sour Patch candy. Inside the box of candy was a plastic baggie containing four Oxycontin tablets, the complaint said.
In another order, a purchase of Valium was concealed as "Airheads" candy, and the box also included an invoice for a "Sample Order" of "Airheads."
Other orders were disguised as Life Savers gummies and Jolly Rancher candies.
Agents reviewed Bolles' bank accounts and her eBay account, which showed she bought items commonly used in drug manufacturing, including formaldehyde and products used to make hash oils, such as chloroform.
Agents searched Bolles' home in Newark, Del., on Thursday. It wasn't immediately known what authorities found, but her roommate Alexandra Gold, also a physician, was arrested on drug charges.
Bolles will be brought to Orlando for future court proceedings. If convicted of illegally distributing controlled substances, she faces up to 20 years in federal prison.

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

How To join the "Silk Road Anonymous Marketplace 2.0"


How To join the "Silk Road Anonymous Marketplace 2.0"


1.Download Tor Vidalia Bundle here:
https://www.torproject.org/download/download-easy.html.en

2.Install TOR

3. Open TOR and go to this NEW "Silk Road 2.0" adress:
http://silkroad6ownowfk.onion
Other markets:
Sheep Market: http://sheep5u64fi457aw.onion/
Black Market Reloaded: (new adress requires TOR): http://r6rcmz6lga4i5vb4.onion/
Pandora Market: http://pandorajodqp5zrr.onion/

To join Silk Road 2.0 go down below of the empty login field just press on the green words "click here to join". Than you come to the registration site.

4.Go to "Register" and create account

5.To buy something at Silk Road you neet Bitcoins, so go to any shop in your region and exchange money into Bitcoins,for example here: https://mtgox.com/
or: https://www.bitinstant.com/

7.Before you buy any item read the Silk Road Buyer's Guide.

8.If you want to be "100% Safe" you have to encrypt your delivery adress with PGP Encryption
PGP Download: http://www.gpg4win.org/index.html

Very Good Silk Road Guide: http://www.gwern.net/Silk%20Road


To order from Silk Road is 100% SAFE because
the system of Silk Road exists of these 3 components:

1. TOR ( anonymous browser)
2. Bitcoin (Anonymous method to payment)
3. PGP (Program to encode delivery adress)




More Information:
Silk Road Buyer´s Guide´s:
http://www.gwern.net/Silk%20Road
https://vimeo.com/channels/silkroadanonymousmarket
http://mainstreamlos.blogspot.de/
http://www.tumblr.com/blog/mainstreamlos
http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/user/nicolasc/publications/TR-CMU-CyLab-12-018.pdf
http://feeds.feedburner.com/SilkRoadAnonymousMarketplace






New market, called "Pandora- Smooth As Silk" http://pandorajodqp5zrr.onion/

New market, called "Pandora- Smooth As Silk" http://pandorajodqp5zrr.onion/






At first, official market and forum address:
http://pandorajodqp5zrr.onion/

Market:
http://pandorajodqp5zrr.onion
(it`s good practice, to have in your mind address start with pandora and ends with zrr.onion)
Forum:
http://bl3j73taluhwidx5.onion

Who is Alice ?
Alice is person behind Pandora open market and it is identified only by public key presented on this page, any other identities you can consider as possible scam. Alice is very paranoid about both internet and personal security and don`t except she to be chatty. Alice only want to run this market and comment only major issues.

Why i developed Pandora openmarket ?
First i must say, i started programming it like 2 days after SilkRoad closure, because i did not knew about other markets available. After i found out, there are 2 good already established market, that are working well, so there is probably no-need to have third market, but it is already done, and nobody knows, what can happen with those 2 markets (ddos, hacked, seized, closed etc.), so pandora will be there as servers (dedicated, encrypted and very powerful) and equipment are fully paid up for long time in advance.

Why your design is really bad ?
Alice is not into graphic design, if there will be somebody to style pandora market, that person will be welcomed to re-style whole market. Alice aim is to provide code and server-side security and provide simple and effective service for vendors and buyers.

So now Alice decided to go this way with PANDORA:
1) Only verified vendors from another markets will be allowed to register on Pandora marketplace (for free).
2) All vendors must go thru verification, when we verify identity of vendor thru another market (we will contact you and verify on another market to prove it is you and not scam vendor who pretend to be established vendor).
3) New or unknown vendors will have to pay high fee/bond ($500 USD) to prevent scam or not serious vendors of registering.

Silk Road — and 'Dread Pirate Roberts' — back on Web

Silk Road 2.0: http://silkroad6ownowfk.onion

A revamped Silk Road, the notorious online marketplace
A revamped Silk Road, the notorious online marketplace for illegal drugs used by Long Island residents, came online promising more security a month after the Department of Justice shut down its predecessor. (Nov. 6, 2013)

The Silk Road, a near-replica of the notorious online marketplace for illegal drugs, came online Wednesday -- a little more than a month after the U.S. Department of Justice shut down its predecessor of the same name.
Like the original Silk Road, the new website uses the anonymous Web surfing tool Tor and hard-to-trace digital currency Bitcoin to try to cover the tracks of drug dealers and users. The new site had more than 500 listings for drugs for sale Wednesday, from cocaine to Ecstasy, and is scheduled to officially start taking orders this week, according to an announcement on the site.
The site's administrator is a person called "Dread Pirate Roberts," the same pseudonym allegedly used by Ross Ulbricht, a San Francisco man federal authorities have charged was the original Silk Road owner.


As part of its takedown operation, the FBI last month arrested Ulbricht, 29, on charges of narcotics trafficking conspiracy, money laundering conspiracy, and computer hacking conspiracy. Authorities allege the website facilitated the equivalent of $1.2 billion in sales using Bitcoin during a 2 1/2-year period.
Ulbricht made a brief appearance in federal court in Manhattan Wednesday, during which a judge scheduled a bail hearing for Nov. 21. Ulbricht, a former Eagle Scout with an advanced degree in chemical engineering, is being held without bail.
His lawyer, Joshua Dratel, said Wednesday his client is not the "Dread Pirate Roberts" who ran the first site.
"He's a regular person, a loyal friend . . . someone who has never been in trouble," Dratel said outside court. "We're denying the charges against him."
The major difference between the new site and its predecessor is an encryption key buyers and sellers can use to make it more difficult for authorities to identify them.
Another new wrinkle is a login page that mocks the seizure message posted by the Justice Department on the original Silk Road site, which reads "This Hidden Site Has Been Seized." The new site changes that message to read "This Hidden Site Has Risen Again."
"You can never kill the idea of Silk Road," the new "Dread Pirate Roberts" wrote on his or her Twitter feed shortly before the site came online.
A federal law enforcement source in New York said it's possible the new site is being managed by administrators who helped operate the original Silk Road.
"It doesn't matter how many times they try and resurrect it," the source said of the site. "It's not a legal operation, and it won't last."
Federal authorities on Oct. 2 shut down the original Silk Road, which had more than 900,000 registered users who purchased heroin, cocaine, opioid pills, LSD, Ecstasy and other drugs.

Just a month after shutdown, Silk Road 2.0 emerge

Ars Technica About a month ago (October, 2013), notorious Tor and Bitcoin-enabled drug marketplace The Silk Road, was  seized and shuttered by American law enforcement.You didn't think that was the end of the story, did you?
Now, yet another anonymous person online has taken up the persona of Dread Pirate Roberts, and created The Silk Road 2.0 (http://silkroad6ownowfk.onion , naturally only reachable via a Tor Browser). The new marketplace has not just the same logo and layout, but also many active vendors. While there are a number of other sites that have sprung up in the wake of the original Silk Road, this new one appears to best retain the spirit of its predecessor. (Ars editor Cyrus Farivar has created an account under "cfarivar" for journalistic purposes, but owns no bitcoins and has no intention of making any purchases.)
Indeed, the new DPR has retained much of the same bombastic rhetoric, in a new message sent out to users on 6 November.
"Over the last 4 weeks, we have implemented a complete security overhaul. This overhaul marks the dawn of a brand new era for hidden services, and it would not have been possible without the patient support of this community. So for waiting patiently; for offering encouragement; for keeping the community spirit alive in Silk Road's temporary absence; for all of this and more, each of you has my deepest and most sincere gratitude.
It took the FBI two and a half years to do what they did. Divide, conquer and eliminate was their strategy… but four weeks of temporary silence is all they got. And as our resilient community bounces back even stronger than ever before, never forget that they can only ever seize assets -- they can never arrest our spirit, our ideas or our passion, unless we let them.
We will not let them."
Like its predecessor, the new Silk Road offers both drugs (heroin, ectasy, marijuana) and fake documents -- one vendor purports to be selling Lithuanian passports for the low price of about $2,000 (£1,200).
The site isn't quite ready for visitors to buy and sell goods just yet. DPR has outlined a staggered rollout between 6 November and 9 November, when sales can begin.
According to  Mashable, the new Silk Road has a similar structure to the old -- the site is taking a 4 to 8 percent cut of each transaction. New vendors will have to send a "dated message with a PGP encryption key known to the former Silk Road" or send a $200 (£124) refundable bond to be repaid once the vendor provides his or her bona fides.
Government officials have already taken notice of the new site.
"This new website -- launched barely a month after Federal agents shut down the original Silk Road -- underscores the inescapable reality that technology is dynamic and ever-evolving and that government policy needs to adapt accordingly," Sen. Tom Carper (D-DE) said in a  statement on his website on 6 November.
"Rather than play 'whack-a-mole' with the latest website, currency, or other method criminals are using in an effort to evade the law, we need to develop thoughtful, nimble, and sensible federal policies that protect the public without stifling innovation and economic growth."

Silk Road 2.0: http://silkroad6ownowfk.onion 


Silk Road 2.0: New criminal website up and running


Silk Road 2.0 — the successor website to the online anonymous crime marketplace taken down by the FBI when they arrested its alleged owner last month — went live Wednesday on the so-called “Dark Web,” according to tweets from the new site’s founder and reports in the technology press.
“#SilkRoad is back up,” tweeted the new site’s administrator, who, like his predecessor, uses the name Dread Pirate Roberts. “You can never kill the idea of #SilkRoad.”
The site — an anarchic, secret Web marketplace known as the “eBay of crime” — can be found only by using Tor, a service that provides anonymity to Internet users. Silk Road purchases are made using Bitcoins, an Internet currency based on cryptography.
On Oct. 1, the FBI arrested Ross W. Ulbricht, who it accuses of being the previous Dread Pirate Roberts. Prosecutors said in court filings that the old Silk Road had brokered more than $1.2 billion worth of illegal sales, mainly of drugs, and earned $80 million in commission fees in less than three years.
Some have criticized those figures as being too high because they are based on the current-dollar price of Bitcoins, whose value has fluctuated amid a steadily rising trend over the past 3 1/2 years.
Authorities said the Silk Road had nearly a million registered user accounts, and facilitated more than 1.2 million transactions by nearly 5,000 vendors. They called it “the most sophisticated and extensive criminal marketplace on the Internet.”

Dark net marketplace Silk Road 'back online'

Dark net marketplace Silk Road 'back online'

 Silk Road 2.0: http://silkroad6ownowfk.onion

Notice on new Silk Road site 
 A new version of the notorious Silk Road appears to be online

Related Stories

Reports suggest that the Silk Road, the anonymous marketplace that traded in drugs and other illegal goods, is back online, in a new version.
According to AllThingsVice, a website that monitors the so-called dark net, the new site is already selling a wide range of drugs.
The first version of Silk Road was shut down by the FBI in October and its alleged administrator arrested.
But those behind it always vowed to revive the site.
The new administrator of the revived site has adopted the same handle as the previous operator - Dread Pirate Roberts.
The FBI believe that arrested 29-year-old Ross Ulbricht was the mastermind behind the original site. Mr Ulbricht has denied all charges
Big business The twitter feed for Dread Pirate Roberts reads: "#SilkRoad has lift-off".
According to AllThingsVice, the new homepage reads "This Hidden Site Has Risen Again", parodying the US Department of Justice notice, which read "the hidden site has been seized".
Twitter was buzzing with talk of whether the new site was a genuine replacement or a scam. Others asked how long it would take before it was closed down by the FBI.
According to Ken Westin, a researcher with security firm TripWire, the site looks genuine.
"It appears to be run by the same folks that were running it before," he said.
"They are not going to be able to kill it. It is going to be a game of cat and mouse with the FBI," he added.
Etay Maor, a fraud prevention manager with security firm Trusteer, and an expert on the dark net, said it was anyone's guess how long it would last.
"It could be 24 hours or it could be a year."
But with the Silk Road banking over $1.3bn (£810m) in two years from taking a percentage of sales, he is not surprised that it may be back online.
"It is big business and those behind it want to get it back up," he said.
Worst things In the aftermath of the Silk Road shutdown, alternative dark net marketplaces saw huge increases in traffic.
One, dubbed Project Black Flag, closed down shortly after launch, with the founder Metta Dread Pirate taking the Bitcoin currency accumulated on it with him.
He wrote on the site's forum: "I am sorry for my actions, but with the funds I gathered from the site, I will be able to keep myself from being homeless for the next several months".
But there were plenty more, said Mr Maor.
"The Silk Road was the biggest and everyone knew it, but it is scary the amount of sites on the dark net.
"From selling weapons to money collection for jihadist groups. You name it - the worse things you can think of, it's all there," he said.

 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

New Silk Road drug bazaar opens a month after FBI bust


San Francisco:  A new anonymous Internet marketplace for illegal drugs debuted on Wednesday, with the same name and appearance as the Silk Road website shut down by U.S. law enforcement authorities a month ago.

Like its predecessor, the new Silk Road listed hundreds of advertisements for marijuana, cocaine, ecstasy and other illegal drugs available for purchase from independent sellers using the anonymous Bitcoin digital currency.

On October 1, the Federal Bureau of Investigation shut down the original Silk Road and arrested its alleged mastermind, Ross William Ulbricht, 29, known online as "Dread Pirate Roberts," in San Francisco.

"It took the FBI two-and-a-half years to do what they did ... but four weeks of temporary silence is all they got," a site administrator wrote, also using the "Dread Pirate Roberts" moniker.

The FBI declined to comment on the new version of the Silk Road. For more than two years, the original site acted like an eBay of vice, allowing users to buy and sell illegal goods and services on the assumption that they were safe from the law. Deliveries were made through the mail in discrete packages.

U.S. authorities also say Ulbricht had tried to call out a hit on a user who had threatened to expose the identities of thousands of Silk Road users.

Ulbricht's lawyer on Wednesday said his client would plead not guilty to drug trafficking, hacking and money laundering charges.

The charges against Ulbricht said his website generated sales of more than 9.5 million Bitcoins, roughly equivalent to $1.2 billion.

The new website improves on technology from the previous Silk Road meant to keep identities secret, including measures to keep users from losing their Bitcoins in case the site shuts down, according to the new Dread Pirate Roberts.

Senator Tom Carper, a top lawmaker on the Homeland Security committee, who plans to hold a hearing on digital currencies this month, said the new Silk Road site shows that government needs to adapt to fast-moving technology.

"Rather than play 'whack-a-mole' with the latest website, currency, or other method criminals are using in an effort to evade the law, we need to develop thoughtful, nimble and sensible federal policies that protect the public without stifling innovation and economic growth," Carper said in a statement.

A week after authorities shut down the Silk Road, British police said they arrested four men accused of being significant users of the site.

Two weeks ago, federal prosecutors said 144,336 Bitcoins were discovered on Ulbricht's confiscated computer, adding to more than 30,000 Bitcoins previously seized.

With the digital currency trading at an all-time on Wednesday, those Bitcoins were worth close to $50 million, according to the Mt Gox trading website.

Like the original Silk Road, users access the new site using a no-cost, anti-surveillance service known as the Tor network instead of traditional web browsers.

The relaunched Silk Road will soon hire staff to handle marketing for the site, the administrator mentioned in his post.

"The Silk Road has risen once more. ... Open communication with your old suppliers and customers, let this wonderful news be taken to all corners of the Tor Network and beyond," the person wrote.

© Thomson Reuters 2013

Silk Road Takedown had Ties to Utah

The federal takedown of the online drug market Silk Road Marketplace has a crucial tie to Utah.

The Wired Threat Level blog details how the feds were able to take down the anonymous site and it's administrator, who went by the name "Dread Pirate Roberts." At one point, an undercover investigator agreed to sell cocaine to Roberts, but the address was in Utah.

The delivery address he gave the undercover agent led to the home of Curtis Clark Green, who authorities say was the Silk Road administrator who had been tasked with finding a vendor for the deal. Green, a 47-year-old grandfather in Utah who went by the monikers “Flush” and “chronicpain” joined the site in 2011.

Green has acknowledged in a court document (.pdf) that he received a salary beginning in November 2012 to take on customer service duties for Silk Road, but he was in that role just two months before the feds raided his home on January 17, 2013. The first arrest of a Silk Road administrator was a huge boon to investigators, who say they gained privileged access to private messages that Silk Road users sent each other as well as the details of sales transactions and information about the Bitcoin accounts of users and administrators — including the account of Silk Road’s alleged owner, Ross Ulbricht.




 Silk Road 2.0: http://silkroad6ownowfk.onion

Silk Road returns to web after Fisher teen's purchase and FBI raid

Silk Road 2.0: http://silkroad6ownowfk.onion


New Silk Road 2_1384374185293.jpgOne month after the FBI proclaimed it had shut down an anonymous online marketplace called “Silk Road,” a new version has appeared on the Internet with drugs, phony passports and other items for sale.
The Call 6 Investigators first reported on “The Silk Road Anonymous Marketplace” in May when a Fishers, Ind., teenager was arrested on charges of buying illegal drugs, which were shipped directly to his family’s home in the mail disguised as a cartoon DVD.
Federal agents seized the site early last month, posting a message where the online portal’s front page had previously been located, announcing that the site had been seized. The suspected mastermind behind Silk Road was arrested in California, but Ross William Ulbricht, 29, has denied the charges.
Social media sites like Reddit and Twitter lit up Wednesday with Internet observers reporting they had found a new version of Silk Road now up and running. The site called itself “Silk Road 2.0” and contained a message that read, “We rise again.”
A British newspaper reported it found phony passports and drugs for sale on the new site.
Ulbricht has been transferred from California to New York to await trial on federal conspiracy, computer hacking and narcotics trafficking charges. Federal agents said they tracked $1.2 billion in transactions on the original site, which uses an anonymous technology that makes it difficult to track individual users.
The new Silk Road portal uses a similar anonymous technology, which requires users to download a special web browser that masks the identity of computers that log onto the site.

Online Subterfuge: Silk Road, Tor and Bitcoins

 

As an undergraduate, the FBI closing of the Silk Road anonymous marketplace may not affect you beyond your drug supply or your easy purchase of another fake ID. But if you’re a political dissident in China, or a currency trader in London, the loss of the world’s illicit version of Amazon will cause serious tremors. The Silk Road’s ties to a web of other significant Internet innovations such as Tor and, more importantly, Bitcoins makes its closing a seriously disruptive event with consequences for free speech and commerce in the future.

Early last month, the FBI announced it arrested the owner of Silk Road servers, Ross Ulbricht, along with millions of USD in Bitcoin currency. Drugs accounted for about 70% of Silk Road transactions and forged documents made up most of the rest. Despite the rumors, other “harmful” items like child pornography, weapons, and contract killings were not for sale.  Ironically for all the contraband sold, the Silk Road runs on a government-sponsored, human rights-oriented server. The Silk Road marketplace was accessible through the Tor network, which was originally developed for the purpose of facilitating free speech for journalists, human rights organizations, and activists living in authoritarian states by the US Navy. Tor was also a platform for Silk Road competitors — Atlantis Market (drugs), Black Market Reloaded (Silk Road’s closest competitor), Sheep Marketplace, and the Russian Anonymous Marketplace — who have mostly closed for security reasons, or just temporarily shut their doors in the wake of the FBI crackdown.
The shiny product of the Internet's mint
The shiny product of the Internet’s mint
The Tor network facilitates website anonymity through hidden services: IP addresses (and therefore network location) are rerouted, even behind firewalls, without encryption or exit node tracking. So, if I had wanted to buy a fake ID, I would have had to download the Tor server (separate from Chrome or Safari), access Silk Road via the Tor browser, purchase my own Bitcoins (through bitInstant, for example), find a seller and provide barebones information (a photo, for example). While these exchanges are ethically questionable, the Silk Road’s shutdown takes a firm blow to the freedom of political dissidents. The Tor Network’s strength lies in numbers. Anonymity gets the strongest the bigger the network is and the more times a user’s information can get rerouted and encrypted. With thousands of Tor’s most avid users gone because of the Silk Road closure, I can’t get into a bar before I’m 21, but a Middle Eastern journalist also might have to choose between releasing a controversial exposé on corruption and avoiding jail time.
Silk Road was also serviceable to the illicit market because it used the electronic currency Bitcoins. Bitcoins are purely electronic – although there is a movement to mint physical coins, sold by Mike Caldwell – and are made secure with a private key held by each owner. If users are careless with their private key, they can loose their cyber-cash. The anonymity of purchases served as the backbone for the Silk Road. Sellers were obligated to delete any sort of unique buyer information after confirmation of item arrival; the “legal laundering” of the Bitcoin system facilitated further lack of identification. For this reason, crypto-currency often comes under attack by pundits and policymakers, accused of being a legal form of money laundering. (To find out more about the nature of Bitcoins — how they are ‘mined’ or created, their verification process and their elusive creator — please check out ‘Coining the Web’s Currency’ in BPR’s last print edition.)
There is now even a Bitcoin Foundation to serve as an intermediary between the global reach of Bitcoins and users or the government. Bitcoin popularity has led to more federal attempts to control virtual currency, and by extension black markets like Silk Road. The New York state superintendent of financial services Benjamin Lawsky wrote, “If virtual currencies remain a virtual Wild West for narco-traffickers and other criminals, that would not only threaten our country’s national security, but also the very existence of the virtual currency industry as a legitimate business enterprise.”
The currency has been wildly fluctuating, in part due to its inhabitance of a legal gray area in most of the world. This leads to rampant speculation and a lack of regulation in large markets like China. However, the fact that Bitcoins lie outside the government’s purview also makes them attractive for people like European citizens worried about the effect on their Euros of future austerity measures, bank grabs and financial red tape.
Anonymity gets the strongest the bigger the network is and the more times a user’s information can get rerouted and encrypted. With thousands of Tor’s most avid users gone because of the Silk Road closure, a Middle Eastern journalist also might have to choose between releasing a controversial exposé on corruption and avoiding jail time. Bitcoin’s investors are not even a fringe group any more. Apparently, Bitcoin has more venture capital investors and angel investors than actual start-ups do. While illicit marketplaces are not investable because of their anonymity and peer-to-peer set up, Bitcoins are a way to capitalize on these marketplaces. Even the Winklevoss brothers (of Facebook notoriety) jumped on the Bitcoin bandwagon. Pre-Silk Road shutdown, they and other investors fronted $12 million for Bitcoin startups between April and June this year. Although the currency was not designed to attract significant investment, savvy and forward-looking investors have watched the Bitcoin evolution and applied some of the same thinking seen in The Social Network to something far outside that sphere.
All of this is to say that the decrease in Bitcoin usage that came from Silk Road’s shutdown is a knock on Internet innovation. The currency is colored by critics as: marginally legal, black-market oriented, deflationary, needlessly complex, minimally beneficial, wildly fluctuating and on and on. But it is also the currency that doesn’t require a bank or registration. It is unregulated, but subsequently free from the prying eyes and heavy hand of the government. It frees commerce in places where there is cronyism and corruption, and to an extent insures savings for families in volatile economies. The limiting of Bitcoin’s commercial power with Ulbricht’s arrest is also paired with the FBI seizure of his 26,000 Bitcoins, valued at $3.25 million, which could depress prices if the government sells them off at auction.
Silk Road’s successful facilitation of illicit markets was largely due to its peer-to-peer platform – both with seller credibility and Bitcoin payments –, and a certain honesty-among-thieves logic. The shutdown will prove momentarily problematic for sellers whose information has not been erased and annoying for buyers who now have to find other sources for drugs, fake IDs or lock picking equipment. Bitcoins will continue to circulate internationally, spurred by investors. The Silk Road shutdown is more concerning due to its connections with the Tor Network and the increased policing by the United States government of any kind of anonymous web organization. The FBI’s shutdown of the Silk Road is in part a reneging on Tor network’s original conception to provide freedom to Internet users. Their attack on that element of commerce could be the basis for further demonization and crackdowns on the web’s anonymous and relatively unregulated currencies. The voluntary closing of Silk Road’s competitors indicates the fear spurred by increased policing, and raises questions about the future of online trading and anonymous communities. Though a huge cabal of forgers and drug dealers doesn’t sound like the best thing to have easily available online, the consequences for a freer Internet should be concerning enough to give us pause before we go on future electronic crusades.

Thursday, November 07, 2013

Silk Road 2.0: New criminal website up and running/ Silk Road 2.0 adress: http://silkroad6ownowfk.onion



Silk Road 2.0 — the successor website to the online anonymous crime marketplace taken down by the FBI when they arrested its alleged owner last month — went live Wednesday on the so-called “Dark Web,” according to tweets from the new site’s founder and reports in the technology press.
“#SilkRoad is back up,” tweeted the new site’s administrator, who, like his predecessor, uses the name Dread Pirate Roberts. “You can never kill the idea of #SilkRoad.”
The site — an anarchic, secret Web marketplace known as the “eBay of crime” — can be found only by using Tor, a service that provides anonymity to Internet users. Silk Road purchases are made using Bitcoins, an Internet currency based on cryptography.
On Oct. 1, the FBI arrested Ross W. Ulbricht, who it accuses of being the previous Dread Pirate Roberts. Prosecutors said in court filings that the old Silk Road had brokered more than $1.2 billion worth of illegal sales, mainly of drugs, and earned $80 million in commission fees in less than three years.
Some have criticized those figures as being too high because they are based on the current-dollar price of Bitcoins, whose value has fluctuated amid a steadily rising trend over the past 3 1/2 years.
Authorities said the Silk Road had nearly a million registered user accounts, and facilitated more than 1.2 million transactions by nearly 5,000 vendors. They called it “the most sophisticated and extensive criminal marketplace on the Internet.”

New Silk Road 2.0 adress (requires TOR):

http://silkroad6ownowfk.onion

Silk Road 2.0 Rises Again - New Adress: http://silkroad6ownowfk.onion

 

Dark net marketplace Silk Road 2.0 'back online'

Silk Road 2.0:   http://silkroad6ownowfk.onion

How To join the "Silk Road Anonymous Marketplace 2.0"

1.Download Tor Vidalia Bundle here:
torproject.org/download/download-easy.html.en
2.Install TOR
3. Open TOR and go to this NEW "Silk Road" adress:
http://silkroad6ownowfk.onion
Down below of the empty login field just press on the green words "click here to join". Than you come to the registration site.
4.Go to "Register" and create account
5.To buy something at Silk Road you neet Bitcoins, so go to any shop in your region and exchange money into Bitcoins,for example here: mtgox.com/
7.Before you buy any item read the Silk Road Buyer's Guide.

8.If you want to be "100% Safe" you have to encrypt your delivery adress with PGP Encryption
PGP Download: gpg4win.org/index.html

Very Good Silk Road Guide: gwern.net/Silk%20Road
To order from Silk Road is 100% SAFE because
the system of Silk Road exists of these 3 components:
1. TOR ( anonymous browser)
2. Bitcoin (Anonymous method to payment)
3. PGP (Program to encode delivery adress)


More Information:
Silk Road Buyer´s Guide´s:
gwern.net/Silk%20Road
mainstreamlos.blogspot.de/
vimeo.com/channels/silkroadanonymousmarket
tumblr.com/blog/mainstreamlos
andrew.cmu.edu/user/nicolasc/publications/TR-CMU-CyLab-12-018.pdf
feeds.feedburner.com/SilkRoadAnonymousMarketplace
Silk Road Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silk_Road_%28marketplace%29
PGP Encryption Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pretty_Good_Privacy
PGP Download: gpg4win.org/index.html
How to use PGP Encryption: youtube.com/watch?v=SywCI91kfq0
Hidden Wiki & Black Market & Silk Road Wiki (all links require TOR):
Hidden Wiki: kpvz7ki2v5agwt35.onion/wiki/index.php/Main_Page
Silk Road Wiki: dkn255hz262ypmii.onion/wiki/index.php/Main_Page
Silk Road Forum (if you need help): dkn255hz262ypmii.onion/



An almost exact copy of the notorious internet marketplace for illicit drugs called Silk Road was launched on Wednesday. The platform comes online a month after the FBI shut down the original one and arrested its alleged founder.
The new Silk Road’s welcome page mocks law enforcers’ efforts to put an end to online illegal drug sales. It’s designed in imitation of the FBI sign placed upon the outlawed old version of the website, only instead of “The hidden site has been seized,” it reads “The hidden site has risen.”
Just like the original Silk Road, its new version can be accessed via the anonymous browser Tor. Purchases can be made by the digital currency bitcoin, believed to be untraceable.
Already at its launch the new version of the site offered its users a choice from 500 various drug listings.
"'It took the FBI two-and-a-half years to do what they did ... but four weeks of temporary silence is all they got,” reads a note from the site administrator, who as in the case with the shuttered site, goes under the nickname of 'Dread Pirate Roberts'.
Silk Road has risen from the ashes, and is now ready and waiting for you all to return home," it adds.
The Federal Bureau of Investigation shut it down on October 1. It also arrested the alleged mastermind of the website and the online personality of 'Dread Pirate Roberts', Ross William Ulbricht, 29. He is accused of drug trafficking, hacking and money laundering.
According to court papers, Silk Road generated sales of more than 9.5 million bitcoins (roughly $1.2 billion).
His lawyer, Joshua Dratel, announced on Wednesday his client would plead not guilty and would ask a judge to release him on bail.
"He is not the person that they are saying he is," Dratel said, as cited by USA Today. "He is a regular person, someone who has never been in trouble."
The new ‘Dead Pirate Roberts’ has already appeared on Twitter, posting on progress being made by the relaunched Silk Road.

The online personality promises improved secrecy to the Silk Road’s users as well as measures to prevent their digital money from being lost in case of another shutdown by law enforcers.  
The closure of the previous version of Silk Road in October included the seizure of $3.6 million worth of bitcoins, the FBI reported.
A few days later, internet users discovered what they believed was the FBI’s bitcoin wallet and started bombarding it with tiny donations attached with critical messages.
A week after the arrest of the alleged Silk Road founder, eight more people were detained in connection with the case in Britain, Sweden and the US.
Two weeks ago, federal prosecutors announced they seized another 144,336 bitcoins found on Ulbricht's confiscated computer, approximately equivalent to $28.5 million.

New Silk Road 2.0 adress (requires TOR):  http://silkroad6ownowfk.onion

New Silk Road drug bazaar opens a month after FBI bust

NewSilk Road 2.0 adress (requires TOR):
http://silkroad6ownowfk.onion

New Silk Road drug bazaar opens a month after FBI bust


San Francisco:  A new anonymous Internet marketplace for illegal drugs debuted on Wednesday, with the same name and appearance as the Silk Road website shut down by U.S. law enforcement authorities a month ago.

Like its predecessor, the new Silk Road listed hundreds of advertisements for marijuana, cocaine, ecstasy and other illegal drugs available for purchase from independent sellers using the anonymous Bitcoin digital currency.

On October 1, the Federal Bureau of Investigation shut down the original Silk Road and arrested its alleged mastermind, Ross William Ulbricht, 29, known online as "Dread Pirate Roberts," in San Francisco.

"It took the FBI two-and-a-half years to do what they did ... but four weeks of temporary silence is all they got," a site administrator wrote, also using the "Dread Pirate Roberts" moniker.

The FBI declined to comment on the new version of the Silk Road. For more than two years, the original site acted like an eBay of vice, allowing users to buy and sell illegal goods and services on the assumption that they were safe from the law. Deliveries were made through the mail in discrete packages.

U.S. authorities also say Ulbricht had tried to call out a hit on a user who had threatened to expose the identities of thousands of Silk Road users.

Ulbricht's lawyer on Wednesday said his client would plead not guilty to drug trafficking, hacking and money laundering charges.

The charges against Ulbricht said his website generated sales of more than 9.5 million Bitcoins, roughly equivalent to $1.2 billion.

The new website improves on technology from the previous Silk Road meant to keep identities secret, including measures to keep users from losing their Bitcoins in case the site shuts down, according to the new Dread Pirate Roberts.

Senator Tom Carper, a top lawmaker on the Homeland Security committee, who plans to hold a hearing on digital currencies this month, said the new Silk Road site shows that government needs to adapt to fast-moving technology.

"Rather than play 'whack-a-mole' with the latest website, currency, or other method criminals are using in an effort to evade the law, we need to develop thoughtful, nimble and sensible federal policies that protect the public without stifling innovation and economic growth," Carper said in a statement.

A week after authorities shut down the Silk Road, British police said they arrested four men accused of being significant users of the site.

Two weeks ago, federal prosecutors said 144,336 Bitcoins were discovered on Ulbricht's confiscated computer, adding to more than 30,000 Bitcoins previously seized.

With the digital currency trading at an all-time on Wednesday, those Bitcoins were worth close to $50 million, according to the Mt Gox trading website.

Like the original Silk Road, users access the new site using a no-cost, anti-surveillance service known as the Tor network instead of traditional web browsers.

The relaunched Silk Road will soon hire staff to handle marketing for the site, the administrator mentioned in his post.

"The Silk Road has risen once more. ... Open communication with your old suppliers and customers, let this wonderful news be taken to all corners of the Tor Network and beyond," the person wrote.

Silk Road — and 'Dread Pirate Roberts' — back on Web

Silk Road — and 'Dread Pirate Roberts' — back on Web

New Silk Road 2.0 adress (reqquires TOR): 

 http://silkroad6ownowfk.onion

A revamped Silk Road, the notorious online marketplace
A revamped Silk Road, the notorious online marketplace for illegal drugs used by Long Island residents, came online promising more security a month after the Department of Justice shut down its predecessor. (Nov. 6, 2013)
The Silk Road, a near-replica of the notorious online marketplace for illegal drugs, came online Wednesday -- a little more than a month after the U.S. Department of Justice shut down its predecessor of the same name.
Like the original Silk Road, the new website uses the anonymous Web surfing tool Tor and hard-to-trace digital currency Bitcoin to try to cover the tracks of drug dealers and users. The new site had more than 500 listings for drugs for sale Wednesday, from cocaine to Ecstasy, and is scheduled to officially start taking orders this week, according to an announcement on the site.
The site's administrator is a person called "Dread Pirate Roberts," the same pseudonym allegedly used by Ross Ulbricht, a San Francisco man federal authorities have charged was the original Silk Road owner.


As part of its takedown operation, the FBI last month arrested Ulbricht, 29, on charges of narcotics trafficking conspiracy, money laundering conspiracy, and computer hacking conspiracy. Authorities allege the website facilitated the equivalent of $1.2 billion in sales using Bitcoin during a 2 1/2-year period.
Ulbricht made a brief appearance in federal court in Manhattan Wednesday, during which a judge scheduled a bail hearing for Nov. 21. Ulbricht, a former Eagle Scout with an advanced degree in chemical engineering, is being held without bail.
His lawyer, Joshua Dratel, said Wednesday his client is not the "Dread Pirate Roberts" who ran the first site.
"He's a regular person, a loyal friend . . . someone who has never been in trouble," Dratel said outside court. "We're denying the charges against him."
The major difference between the new site and its predecessor is an encryption key buyers and sellers can use to make it more difficult for authorities to identify them.
Another new wrinkle is a login page that mocks the seizure message posted by the Justice Department on the original Silk Road site, which reads "This Hidden Site Has Been Seized." The new site changes that message to read "This Hidden Site Has Risen Again."
"You can never kill the idea of Silk Road," the new "Dread Pirate Roberts" wrote on his or her Twitter feed shortly before the site came online.
A federal law enforcement source in New York said it's possible the new site is being managed by administrators who helped operate the original Silk Road.
"It doesn't matter how many times they try and resurrect it," the source said of the site. "It's not a legal operation, and it won't last."
Federal authorities on Oct. 2 shut down the original Silk Road, which had more than 900,000 registered users who purchased heroin, cocaine, opioid pills, LSD, Ecstasy and other drugs.

Just a month after shutdown, Silk Road 2.0 emerges

  New Silk Road 2.0 adress (requires TOR):

http://silkroad6ownowfk.onion

Just a month after shutdown, Silk Road 2.0 emerges





Silk Road
About a month ago (October, 2013), notorious Tor and Bitcoin-enabled drug marketplace The Silk Road, was  seized and shuttered by American law enforcement.You didn't think that was the end of the story, did you?
Now, yet another anonymous person online has taken up the persona of Dread Pirate Roberts, and created The Silk Road 2.0 http://silkroad6ownowfk.onion , naturally only reachable via a Tor Browser). The new marketplace has not just the same logo and layout, but also many active vendors. While there are a number of other sites that have sprung up in the wake of the original Silk Road, this new one appears to best retain the spirit of its predecessor. (Ars editor Cyrus Farivar has created an account under "cfarivar" for journalistic purposes, but owns no bitcoins and has no intention of making any purchases.)
Indeed, the new DPR has retained much of the same bombastic rhetoric, in a new message sent out to users on 6 November.
"Over the last 4 weeks, we have implemented a complete security overhaul. This overhaul marks the dawn of a brand new era for hidden services, and it would not have been possible without the patient support of this community. So for waiting patiently; for offering encouragement; for keeping the community spirit alive in Silk Road's temporary absence; for all of this and more, each of you has my deepest and most sincere gratitude.
It took the FBI two and a half years to do what they did. Divide, conquer and eliminate was their strategy… but four weeks of temporary silence is all they got. And as our resilient community bounces back even stronger than ever before, never forget that they can only ever seize assets -- they can never arrest our spirit, our ideas or our passion, unless we let them.
We will not let them."
Like its predecessor, the new Silk Road offers both drugs (heroin, ectasy, marijuana) and fake documents -- one vendor purports to be selling Lithuanian passports for the low price of about $2,000 (£1,200).
The site isn't quite ready for visitors to buy and sell goods just yet. DPR has outlined a staggered rollout between 6 November and 9 November, when sales can begin.
According to  Mashable, the new Silk Road has a similar structure to the old -- the site is taking a 4 to 8 percent cut of each transaction. New vendors will have to send a "dated message with a PGP encryption key known to the former Silk Road" or send a $200 (£124) refundable bond to be repaid once the vendor provides his or her bona fides.
Government officials have already taken notice of the new site.
"This new website -- launched barely a month after Federal agents shut down the original Silk Road -- underscores the inescapable reality that technology is dynamic and ever-evolving and that government policy needs to adapt accordingly," Sen. Tom Carper (D-DE) said in a  statement on his website on 6 November.
"Rather than play 'whack-a-mole' with the latest website, currency, or other method criminals are using in an effort to evade the law, we need to develop thoughtful, nimble, and sensible federal policies that protect the public without stifling innovation and economic growth."